Central America-4 Free Mobility Agreement

In 2006, the northern triangle states (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua) signed a treaty to ensure the free movement of their citizens in Central America. In accordance with the official Central American Free Trade Agreement (CA4), the central African Free Trade Agreement (CA4) is established to promote cultural exchange, harmonization of peoples and the economy. Similarly, this official document also commits to the following intentions: you must present your passport at each border, pay 3 USD to enter Honduras, 12/13 USD to enter Nicaragua. If you leave Guatemala, it actually happens to me, they said that because I was only Guatemalan for two days and would only give me 30 days, not the time I had left on my original visa before entering Belize. They generously offered to take the paperwork for 200Q and gave me 90 days. It is certainly not like the Schengen agreement in Europe. Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua have a visa agreement called CA-4. This is a 90-day visa that is issued to you by the first country in which you enter out of the four. It allows you to enter each of them. What is the integration process? The fundamental objective of the integration process is to make Central America and the Dominican Republic a region of peace, freedom, democracy and development. Other data that provide an overview of the situation in ca-4 countries include decent work indicators. Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala are the lowest among the 18 Latin American and Caribbean countries, according to the Inter-American Development Bank`s (TSA) 2015 Better Jobs Index.

With regard to freedom of association, a research paper by the Confederation of American Trade Unions (TUCA) – Unionization and Union Density in the Americas – indicates that unionization rates were 12% in Nicaragua in 2010, 8% in Honduras, 7% in El Salvador and 2% in Guatemala. Integration in the region has been marked by many upheavals, such as the brief war between El Salvador and Honduras in 1969 or the armed conflicts that ravaged El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua from the 1970s to the late 1980s. In 1993, the “variable geometry” approach was adopted, allowing two or more countries to enter into agreements and move to a higher degree of integration than others will be able to sign at a later date. This approach paved the way for the Central American Mobility Agreement signed in 2006 between El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, known as CA-4, which grants freedom of movement to citizens of these countries upon presentation of a national identity card. In other words, in simpler terms, the countries that are part of CA4 can move freely and unimpeded through this Central American corridor. However, there is a very important restriction, and that is that minors must present their passports to the judicial authorities of each country, a measure that has been imposed to prevent human trafficking. My question is: do we still have to present our passports at the borders or can we just stay on the bus/ keep running? I understand that it is like the Schemgen agreement, where there are sometimes no border posts. Of course, this caravan of migrants is fuelled by the agreement signed by the countries of the North Triangle in 2006, the famous CA4. The circumstantial situation that is taking place these days has its roots in this treaty, so it is obvious that there are virtually no restrictions on reaching Mexico and that the regulations on minors are not enforced because of a large number of people who transfer borders. He said the CA-4 agreement, which allows citizens of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua to move freely throughout the region, facilitated the passage of migrants through Guatemala en route to the United States.